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nprfreshair:

For the 50th anniversary of A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles, John Powers reviews the Criterion DVD release:

"In the unmistakable alchemy of their sound – and in their authentic laughter as they run from shrieking fans during the film’s opening credits – The Beatles embodied the hope and vitality the world was looking for then and still loves to this day. Like Louis Armstrong, they created music that, even when sad, is bursting with joy. All those hard days and nights paid off, for more than any band I can think of, they captured the yeah-yeah-yeah of happiness."

Read the full review: 'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy
Photo via Janus films 

nprfreshair:

For the 50th anniversary of A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles, John Powers reviews the Criterion DVD release:

"In the unmistakable alchemy of their sound – and in their authentic laughter as they run from shrieking fans during the film’s opening credits – The Beatles embodied the hope and vitality the world was looking for then and still loves to this day. Like Louis Armstrong, they created music that, even when sad, is bursting with joy. All those hard days and nights paid off, for more than any band I can think of, they captured the yeah-yeah-yeah of happiness."

Read the full review: 'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy

Photo via Janus films 

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laughingsquid:

Creator Matthew Weiner Discusses The Award-Winning Sets of ‘Mad Men’
Photo
brightwalldarkroom:

“Life is for the living.Death is for the dead.Let life be like music. And death a note unsaid.”  
—Langston Hughes

brightwalldarkroom:

“Life is for the living.
Death is for the dead.
Let life be like music.
And death a note unsaid.”  

—Langston Hughes

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oldbookillustrations:

Guyon is of immodest Merth, led into loose desire, Fights with Cymochles, whiles his bro- ther burnes in furious fire.
Walter Crane, from Spenser’s Faerie queene vol. 2, by Edmund Spenser, London, 1895.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Guyon is of immodest Merth,
led into loose desire,
Fights with Cymochles, whiles his bro-
ther burnes in furious fire.

Walter Crane, from Spenser’s Faerie queene vol. 2, by Edmund Spenser, London, 1895.

(Source: archive.org)

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nprfreshair:

Les Indiscrètes
From Book: Unpublished Photographs of Jeanloup Sieff

nprfreshair:


Les Indiscrètes

From Book: Unpublished Photographs of Jeanloup Sieff

(Source: luzfosca)

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hitrecordjoe:

ORDER “THE TINY BOOK OF TINY STORIES” HERE
==
hitrecord:

"what the universe is made of…"
REmix by sinnamin
HERE on hitRECord

hitrecordjoe:

ORDER “THE TINY BOOK OF TINY STORIES” HERE

==

hitrecord:

"what the universe is made of…"

REmix by sinnamin

HERE on hitRECord

(Source: sinnaminie)

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nprfreshair:

TV critic David Bianculli reviews two new horror shows: a remake of Rosemary’s Baby set in Paris andPenny Dreadfulset in Victorian England.  While both attempt to “revisit old works of literature in the horror and suspense genre, and adapt them with new approaches for a new generation, Rosemary’s Baby "barely justifies the attempt."  Here’s what he says about Penny Dreadful: 

"I can recommend Penny Dreadful, which starts Sunday on Showtime, a lot more enthusiastically. John Logan, screenwriter of the movies Hugo and Skyfall, sets this new series in London, in 1891. Timothy Dalton, who once played James Bond, plays an intrepid explorer looking for his missing daughter. Eva Green, star of Tim Burton’s recent remake of Dark Shadows, plays Vanessa Ives, a strikingly stunning woman who dresses in black and has her own hidden agendas – and powers. They combine forces on a mission that takes them deep into London’s underworld, a place less natural than supernatural. And in the premiere episode, after seeing a traveling Wild West show, Vanessa visits the star sharpshooter, played by Josh Hartnett, to try and enlist his services. He’s eager to flirt, but she’s all business.”

nprfreshair:

TV critic David Bianculli reviews two new horror shows: a remake of Rosemary’s Baby set in Paris andPenny Dreadfulset in Victorian England.  While both attempt to “revisit old works of literature in the horror and suspense genre, and adapt them with new approaches for a new generation, Rosemary’s Baby "barely justifies the attempt."  Here’s what he says about Penny Dreadful

"I can recommend Penny Dreadful, which starts Sunday on Showtime, a lot more enthusiastically. John Logan, screenwriter of the movies Hugo and Skyfall, sets this new series in London, in 1891. Timothy Dalton, who once played James Bond, plays an intrepid explorer looking for his missing daughter. Eva Green, star of Tim Burton’s recent remake of Dark Shadows, plays Vanessa Ives, a strikingly stunning woman who dresses in black and has her own hidden agendas – and powers. They combine forces on a mission that takes them deep into London’s underworld, a place less natural than supernatural. And in the premiere episode, after seeing a traveling Wild West show, Vanessa visits the star sharpshooter, played by Josh Hartnett, to try and enlist his services. He’s eager to flirt, but she’s all business.”

Photoset

archiemcphee:

It’s never too soon to share more of Hoang Tran’s pop culture-based crayon sculptures (previously featured here). In addition to the extraordinarily careful carving (check out how thin Jack Skellington’s neck is!), Tran melts other crayons applies the melted wax to his sculptures to accentuate the tiniest details such as clothing and facial features.

For a regular dose of creatively-carved crayons follow Tran here on Tumblr at Wax Nostalgic. You can also purchased original pieces via his Etsy shop, CarvedCrayons.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

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laughingsquid:

An Interactive Map of the Lands From the ‘Game of Thrones’ Television Show and ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ Novel Series
Photoset

archiemcphee:

When French illustrator Thomas Lamadieu looks up at the patches of blue sky between city buildings, he imagines fanciful characters existing in the geometric gaps formed by the neighboring buildings. Lamadieu shoots photos of those patches of sky and illustrates them for an ongoing series entitled Sky Art. Thus far he has drawn pictures on the skies over streets and enclosed courtyards in France, Germany, Belgium and Canada.

Head over to Thomas Lamadieu’s website to view more images from his whimsical Sky Art series.

[via Colossal]