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adventuretime:

If you’re going to read just one wonderful Adventure Time write-up today (and you should), make it this one by Maria Bustillos. In it, she talks with the key creative gang of Pen, Adam, Pat, Kent, Rebecca, Nick, and Jack, making for a fairly definitive overview of the series. Read it here. Thanks, Maria!

The resolution of each eleven-minute episode is anything but tidily triumphant; each one is as likely to end on a question or a joke as on an answer. Yet one comes away satisfied, a little bit the way one might at a David Lynch movie. The narrative is endlessly malleable, and includes all the possibilities granted by the existence of wizards and magical creatures, time travel, and a huge, ever-evolving cast. It’s a canvas and a story big enough for dozens of artists to make their own way. Even the drawing style is inconsistent, handmade-feeling; longtime fans may learn to detect the hand or voice of a favorite storyboard artist or writer. The goal of the show seems to be exploration, not uniformity.

adventuretime:

If you’re going to read just one wonderful Adventure Time write-up today (and you should), make it this one by Maria Bustillos. In it, she talks with the key creative gang of Pen, Adam, Pat, Kent, Rebecca, Nick, and Jack, making for a fairly definitive overview of the series. Read it here. Thanks, Maria!

The resolution of each eleven-minute episode is anything but tidily triumphant; each one is as likely to end on a question or a joke as on an answer. Yet one comes away satisfied, a little bit the way one might at a David Lynch movie. The narrative is endlessly malleable, and includes all the possibilities granted by the existence of wizards and magical creatures, time travel, and a huge, ever-evolving cast. It’s a canvas and a story big enough for dozens of artists to make their own way. Even the drawing style is inconsistent, handmade-feeling; longtime fans may learn to detect the hand or voice of a favorite storyboard artist or writer. The goal of the show seems to be exploration, not uniformity.

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Banjo on rug.

Banjo on rug.

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"The fact is, there’s an enigmatic relationship between Max and myself. He has meant a tremendous amount to me. Stravinsky once said something good. I heard Blomdahl and him discussing Alban Berg’s Lulu. They were discussing a singer. Stravinsky said she was a bad Lulu, because she was so vulgar. But then Blomdahl, as I remember it, said: ‘But Lulu’s the vulgarest female alive.’ And Stravinsky said: ‘Yes, and that’s why she must be played by an actress who hasn’t a trace of vulgarity in her—but can play it.’ I suppose that’s exactly what I find in Max von Sydow. As an actor, Max is sound through and through. Robust. Technically durable. If I’d had a psychopath to present these deeply psychopathic roles, it would have been unbearable. It’s a question of acting the part of a broken man, not of being him. The sort of exhibitionism in this respect which is all the rage just now will pass over, I think. By and by people will regain their feeling for the subtle detachment which often exists between Max and my madmen.”
— Ingmar Bergman | 1968
"Mr. Bergman was a man of great working discipline. He forced everyone to concentrate when it was important. No disturbing noise during rehearsal. A code of silence. But in between, when [the camera and lighting] was being changed and re-rigged, there were a lot of laughs and a lot of fun. He had a great sense of humor. He had a talent of making people feel that they were participating in something important and something aspiring. He created teamwork. Mr. Bergman had a great imagination and saw the possibilities within every one of his actors, and he gave us great challenges. It was very inspiring. Whatever good I have done on screen I owe to him. I have learned discipline. I have learned concentration and the joy of acting."
— Max von Sydow | 2013

"The fact is, there’s an enigmatic relationship between Max and myself. He has meant a tremendous amount to me. Stravinsky once said something good. I heard Blomdahl and him discussing Alban Berg’s Lulu. They were discussing a singer. Stravinsky said she was a bad Lulu, because she was so vulgar. But then Blomdahl, as I remember it, said: ‘But Lulu’s the vulgarest female alive.’ And Stravinsky said: ‘Yes, and that’s why she must be played by an actress who hasn’t a trace of vulgarity in her—but can play it.’ I suppose that’s exactly what I find in Max von Sydow. As an actor, Max is sound through and through. Robust. Technically durable. If I’d had a psychopath to present these deeply psychopathic roles, it would have been unbearable. It’s a question of acting the part of a broken man, not of being him. The sort of exhibitionism in this respect which is all the rage just now will pass over, I think. By and by people will regain their feeling for the subtle detachment which often exists between Max and my madmen.”

Ingmar Bergman | 1968

"Mr. Bergman was a man of great working discipline. He forced everyone to concentrate when it was important. No disturbing noise during rehearsal. A code of silence. But in between, when [the camera and lighting] was being changed and re-rigged, there were a lot of laughs and a lot of fun. He had a great sense of humor. He had a talent of making people feel that they were participating in something important and something aspiring. He created teamwork. Mr. Bergman had a great imagination and saw the possibilities within every one of his actors, and he gave us great challenges. It was very inspiring. Whatever good I have done on screen I owe to him. I have learned discipline. I have learned concentration and the joy of acting."

Max von Sydow | 2013

(Source: strangewood)

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oldbookillustrations:

Arjuna and the river nymph.
Warwick Goble, from Indian myth and legend, by Donald Alexander Mackenzie, London, 1913.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Arjuna and the river nymph.

Warwick Goble, from Indian myth and legend, by Donald Alexander Mackenzie, London, 1913.

(Source: archive.org)

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nprfreshair:

By now you’ve probably heard the hit song “Let It Go" from Frozen more than a few times—and you’ve probably gotten it stuck in your head, too. That’s the work of songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, the Oscar-winning couple behind the Disney mega-hit.  Robert also co-wrote the satirical musicals The Book of Mormon and Avenue Q.  In the interview, Kristen tells Fresh Air why she set out to write a different kind of princess story: 

Kristen Anderson-Lopez: If you have the deluxe CD you will see my very strong, strike-across-the-bow at all princess myth things in the form of a song called “We Know Better,” which was a song that was cut, but it basically was these two princesses bonding over all of the things that the world expects and thinks of them. [The world thinks] that they’re perfect and sweet and sugar and spice and all things nice and it was the two of them misbehaving and being fully well-rounded children with all the good and bad and imagination and mischief that I really feel that it’s important for our girls to be allowed to be.

It got cut, but you can tell the whole movie is full of this point of view as much as Jennifer Lee and I could put in it, because we’re both Park Slope moms, we both went through the 90s, we took the women’s studies courses, and I knew I wouldn’t be able to push my kids on the swing at the playground if I had written a movie where the girl wore the puffy dress and was saved not by anything active she did but by being beautiful enough to be kissed by a prince.

Photo (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times) and Disney

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laughingsquid:

French Artist Abraham Poincheval Is Living Inside a Taxidermy Bear for 13 Days
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laughingsquid:

Tiny Caribbean Pygmy Octopi Hatched At the Aquarium At Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida
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hitrecord:

CALLING ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS, GRAPHIC ARTISTS, CINEMATOGRAPHERS, & ANIMATORS! 

Let’s build up a repertoire of visuals for Metaphorest’s poem “Worlds Within Worlds” - contribute your macro photography or cinematography, image records, and animations.

==

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Take Photos that correspond to each of the lines in THIS SHOT LIST.

GRAPHIC ARTISTS: Remix visuals from the site to go with with each of the lines.

CINEMATOGRAPHERS: Shoot Video Footage that corresponds to each of the lines.

ANIMATORS: Take visuals from the site and animate them into Cinemagraphs, etc..

==

Contribute to the “WORLDS WITHIN WORLDS” collab HERE!

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archiemcphee:

Norway has just emerged as a challenger for Japan’s title as Masters of Awesome Cuteness. These photos were taken on the set of “Piip-Show”, a live reality tv show following the lives of a cast comprised of wild birds and the occasional squirrel. Conceived by Norwegian freelance photographer Magne Klann, the show takes place on a set which is an outdoor bird feeder modeled after Java, a well-known coffee shop in Oslo, Norway.

“Different personalities meet inside the bar. Among others a short tempered nuthatch, a blue tit with the memory of a gold fish, a happy-go-lucky great tit, and a depressed bullfinch. Like in any other bar there is bickering, petty theft, fighting and attempts at romance”.

We can’t help but try to pair these animals with various cast members from Seinfeld.

Billed as the very first reality show for birds, the “Piip-Show" is a three-month-long project that’s being broadcast live on the Norwegian broadcasting network NRK.

Click here to watch the “Piip-Show” online

[via Junkculture]